Science - 2019-20

3.5 - Living Systems and Processes : Ecosystems

The student will investigate and understand that aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms. Key ideas include

a)  ecosystems are made of living and nonliving components of the environment; and

  • describe basic living and nonliving components in different types of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Bloom's Level: Understand
  • compare and contrast plants and animals that compose aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems Bloom's Level: Analyze

b)  relationships exist among organisms in an ecosystem.

  • differentiate between producers, consumers, and decomposers and identify examples of each within aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.  Bloom's Level: Analyze / Understand
  • construct and analyze a food chain that models relationships and the flow of energy within an ecosystem.  Bloom's Level:  CreateAnalyze
  • explain how a change in one part of a food chain might affect the rest of the food chainBloom's Level: Understand / Apply
  • identify the sun as the source of energy in food chainsBloom's Level:   Knowledge


Adopted: 2018

BIG IDEAS

Ecosystems are diverse in both their living and non-living components.  These complex environments lead to a diversity of organisms that engage in a variety of relationships as they strive to meet life needs.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • All ecosystems are affected by complex biotic (living) and abiotic (nonliving) interactions involving exchange of matter and energy.
  • An ecosystem supports a diversity of organisms that interact with each other and their nonliving environment.
  • Water-related ecosystems include those with fresh water or salt water.
  • Examples of aquatic ecosystems include ponds, marshes, swamps, streams, rivers, and oceans.
  • Dry- land ecosystems include deserts, grasslands, rain forests, and forests.
  • There are distinct differences in the non-living and living components that make up pond, marshland, swamp, stream river, ocean, desert, grassland, rainforest, and forest ecosystems.
  • Organisms depends on each other and on the nonliving components of their environments.  They often compete for resources.
  • Nonliving components of an environment include sunlight, water, nutrients, soil, and air.  Students are NOT expected to know additional nonliving components in third grade. 
  • A food chain shows a feeding relationship among organisms in a specific area or environment that illustrates the flow of energy in the ecosystem.
  • The arrows in  a food chain illustrate the flow of energy from one organism to another.
  • The arrows always point to the organism doing the eating (receiving the energy)

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  How do plants and animals compete for the same natural resources within their dry-land and/or water ecosystem?

·  How can you describe the major water-related and dry-land related ecosystems?

·  How are water-related and dry-land ecosystems similar and different?

·  Why is the sun vital to food chains?

·  What happens when part of a food chain is changed?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • describe living and nonliving components in different types of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.
  • describe major water-related ecosystems and examples of animals and plants that live in each.
  • describe major dry-land ecosystems and examples of animals and plants that live in each.
  • compare and contrast water-related and dry-land ecosystems.
  • explain how animals and plants use resources in their ecosystem.
  • differentiate between producers, consumers, and decomposers
  • identify examples of producers, consumers, and decomposers found in each aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem
  • construct food chains found in each ecosystem
  • analyze what could happen to the food chain if one part is changed.
  • identify the sun as the source of energy in food chains


KEY VOCABULARY

animals

aquatic

compare

consumer

contrast

decomposer

describe

desert

diagram

food chain

forest

fresh water

grassland

land ecosystems

limited resources

marshland

model

ocean

organisms

plants

pond

predict

producer

rain forest

resources

river

salt water

stream

swamp

water ecosystems


Updated: Jan 08, 2020