Science - 2019-20

1.7 - Earth and Space Systems

The student will investigate and understand that there are weather and seasonal changes. Key concepts include

a)  changes in temperature, light, and precipitation occur over time;

  •  identify types of precipitation as rain, snow, and ice. Describe the temperature conditions of each type of precipitation. Bloom's Level:  Knowledge / Understand
  • compare and contrast the activities of some common animals (e.g., squirrels, chipmunks, butterflies, bees, ants, bats, frogs, and humans) during summer and winter by describing changes in their behaviors and body coveringBloom's Level:  Analyze
  • observe and record seasonal data throughout the year including relative temperature, amount of precipitation, and relative amount of sunlight. Compare and contrast recorded data. Bloom's Level:  Understand / Analyze

b)  there are relationships between daily weather and the season; and

  • represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.  Bloom's Level: Analyze / Apply

c)  changes in temperature, light, and precipitation affect plants and animals, including humans.

  • observe and record seasonal changes in plants, including budding, growth, and losing leaves.  Recognize the seasons during which budding and losing leaves will most likely occur.  Bloom's Level: Understand
  • compare and contrast how some common plants appear during summer and winter. Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • compare and contrast the activities of some common animals during summer and winter by describing changes in their behaviors and their body coverings. Bloom's Level: Analyze
  • infer the season based on humans' dress and recreational activities Bloom's Level:  Analyze / Apply


Adopted: 2018

BIG IDEAS

Repeating patterns are clues to cause and effect relationships and provide the opportunity to make predictions. Students look at how changes in temperature, light, and precipitation can help predict the weather which affects plants and animals.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Repeating patterns in nature, or events that occur together with regularity, are clues to cause and effect relationships.
  • The daily weather is composed of the light, temperature, and precipitation.
  • Weather patterns and the amount of sunlight determine the seasons.
  • Seasonal changes bring about changes in plants, animals, and people.
  • Seasonal changes in plants (oak trees, pine trees, and lawn grass) include budding, growth, and losing leaves.
  • Seasonal changes in animals include hibernation and migration resulting in changes in habitat. The focus should be on the concepts, not the terminology.
  • Hibernation is a state of greatly reduced metabolic activity and lowered body temperature adopted by certain mammals as an adaptation to adverse winter conditions. Most animals are not “true hibernators” but rely on a combination of reserve body fat, stored food supplies (in rodents only), and a protected den to enable it to survive the winter. At intervals of several weeks the animal elevates its body temperature, awakens, moves about, feeds, and then returns to its state of torpor.
  • Migration is the regular, usually seasonal, movement of all or part of an animal population to and from a given area. The distance traveled may be a few miles or several thousands of miles. Animals migrate for many different reasons. Some animals migrate to find better sources of food, water, or shelter. Other animals migrate to visit particular breeding grounds, rear their young, or find warmer climates. The frequency of animals’ migrations also differs.
  • The body coverings of some animals change with the seasons. This includes thickness of fur and coloration.
  • Changes made by people include their dress, recreation, and work.


ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  What happens to plants when weather and seasons change?

·  How do animals adjust to weather and seasonal changes?

·  How do people adjust to weather and seasonal changes?

·  How can weather be observed and recorded over time?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • identify types of precipitation as rain, snow, and ice.
  • describe the temperature conditions of each type of precipitation.
  • observe and record seasonal data throughout the year including relative temperature, amount of precipitation and relative amount of sunlight.
  • compare and contrast seasonal data.
  • create and interpret data tables of weather conditions in each season.
  • observe and record changes in plants, including budding, growth, and losing leaves. Recognize in what season budding and losing leaves will most likely occur.
  • compare and contrast how some common plants appear during summer and winter.
  • compare and contrast the activities of some common animals during summer and winter.
  • describe how some animals change their body coverings and behaviors during summer and winter.
  • infer the season based on humans' dress and recreational activities.

KEY VOCABULARY

activities

adapt

animals

behavior (hibernation, migration)

body covering (fur thickness, coloration)

changes

common animals (squirrels, chipmunks, butterflies, bees, ants, frogs, bats, humans

common plants (oak tree, pine tree, lawn grass)

habitat

interdependence

light

observe

people (dress, recreation, work)

plants (budding, growth, losing leaves)

precipitation (rain, snow, ice)

predict

seasons (winter, spring, summer, fall/autumn)

temperature


Updated: Oct 28, 2019