Math - 2019-20

5.2 - Fractions and Decimals

The student will 

a) represent and identify equivalencies among fractions and decimals, with and without models; * and

b) compare and order fractions, mixed numbers, and/or decimals, in a given set, from least to greatest and greatest to least.* 

*On the state assessment, items measuring this objective are assessed without the use of a calculator.



Adopted: 2016

BIG IDEAS

  • So that I can follow (or double) a recipe when baking a birthday cake
  • So that I can measure items more precisely during a scientific experiment
  • So that I can share and divide things equally with my friends
  • So that I can understand decimals better

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Students should focus on determining equivalent decimals of familiar fractions with denominators that are factors of 100 making connections to tenths and hundredths. (e.g., 2 5 = 4 10 or 0.4) and (e.g., 7 20 = 35 100 or 0.35). 
  • Students should have experience with fractions such as 1 8 , whose decimal representation is a terminating decimal (e. g., 1 8 = 0.125) and with fractions such as 2 3 , whose decimal representation does not end but continues to repeat (e. g., 2 3 = 0.666…). The repeating decimal can be written with an ellipsis (three dots) as in 0.666… or denoted with a bar above the digits that repeat as in 0. 6̅. 
  • To help students compare the value of two decimals through thousandths, use manipulatives, such as place value mats/charts, 10-by-10 grids, decimal squares, base-ten blocks, meter sticks, number lines, and money.
  • Proper fractions, improper fractions, and mixed numbers are terms often used to describe fractions. A proper fraction is a fraction whose numerator is less than the denominator. An improper fraction is a fraction whose numerator is equal to or greater than the denominator. An improper fraction may be expressed as a mixed number. A mixed number is written with two parts: a whole number and a proper fraction (e.g., 3 5 8 ).
  • An amount less than one whole can be represented by a fraction or by an equivalent decimal.
  • Base-ten models (e.g., 10-by-10 grids, meter sticks, number lines, decimal squares, money) demonstrate the relationship between fractions and decimals.

ESSENTIALS

The student will use problem solving, mathematical communication, mathematical reasoning, connections, and representations to

  • Represent fractions with denominators that are thirds, eighths, and factors of 100 in their equivalent decimal form with concrete or pictorial models. (a)
  • Represent decimals in their equivalent fraction form (thirds, eighths, and factors of 100) with concrete or pictorial models. (a)
  • Identify equivalent relationships between decimals and fractions with denominators that are thirds, eighths, and factors of 100 in their equivalent decimal form without models. (a)
  • Compare and order from least to greatest and greatest to least a given set of no more than four decimals, fractions (proper or improper), and/or mixed numbers with denominators of 12 or less. (b)
  • Use the symbols >, <, =, and ≠ to compare decimals through thousandths, fractions (proper or improper fractions), and/or mixed numbers, having denominators of 12 or less. (b)

KEY VOCABULARY

Updated: May 29, 2019