Reading - 2018-19

Thematic Topic : Community

Communication:Speaking Listening, Media Literacy

The student will participate in and contribute to small-group activities.

a)  Communicate as leader and contributor.

b)  Evaluate own contributions to discussions.

c)  Summarize and evaluate group activities.

d)  Analyze the effectiveness of participant interactions.

The student will use effective oral communication skills in a variety of settings.

a) Listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.

b) Participate as a facilitator and contributor in a group.

c) Participate in collaborative discussions with partners building on others’ ideas.

d) Ask questions to clarify the speaker’s purpose and perspective.

e) Summarize the main points a speaker makes.

f) Summarize and evaluate group activities.

g) Analyze the effectiveness of participant interactions.

h) Evaluate own contributions to discussions.

i) Demonstrate the ability to collaborate with diverse teams.

j) Work respectfully with others and show value for individual contributions.


Adopted: 2017

BIG IDEAS

  •  Most careers require that workers form teams in order to meet deadlines.  (6.1a, b, c, d and 6.1a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j)
  • It is important to know how to use and understand verbal and nonverbal communication as both a member and leader of a group. (6.1a, d and 6.1a, b, j)
  • It is important to use verbal and nonverbal feedback to evaluate one's own contributions. (6.1b and 6.1 a,h)
  • Working as an effective team increases efficiency. (6.1c, d and 6.1b, i, j)
  • Brainstorming as a group often produces more creative and effective ideas than brainstorming alone. (6.1d and 6.1c)
  • Being part of an effective team creates a support network built on reliance and trust. (6.1a, d and 6.1i, j )
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UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will use oral language effectively.
  • Students will evaluate the effectiveness of the contributions of participants in a variety of roles in a discussion group.
All students should understand verbal and nonverbal feedback from the audience should be used to evaluate contributions.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • interact as both group leader and member.
  • use verbal and nonverbal feedback from the audience to evaluate their own contributions.
  • process and verbalize the content and impact of each participant’s contribution to a discussion.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • ensure that all group members participate in the exchange of information.
  • use strategies that contribute to the discussion.
  • receive and understand feedback from the others.
  • pose and respond to questions.
  • relate and retell information.
  • restate briefly and critically the main idea(s) or theme(s) discussed within a group.
  • use active listening to focus on what is said and what is implied.
  • summarize what is heard.
  • retain and rethink ideas based on what is heard.
  • infer and assimilate new ideas.
  • use a checklist and/or rubric to evaluate the participation of self and others.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • ensure that all group members participate in the exchange of information
  • evaluate the effectiveness of the contributions of participants in a variety of roles in a discussion group
  • use strategies that contribute to the discussion
  • receive and understand feedback from others
  • pose and respond to questions
  • restate briefly and critically the main idea(s) discussed within a group
  • use active listening to focus on what is said and what is implied
  • retain and rethink ideas based on what is heard
  • infer and assimilate new ideas.

Updated: May 29, 2018

The student will present, listen critically, and express opinions in oral presentations.

a)  Distinguish between fact and opinion.

b)  Compare and contrast viewpoints.

c)  Present a convincing argument.

e)  Use language and vocabulary appropriate to audience, topic, and purpose.


The student will create multimodal presentations that effectively communicate ideas.

a) Use effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills to deliver multimodal presentations.

b) Use lanague and vocabulary appropriate to audience, tone, and purpose.

c) Give collaborative and individual formal and informal interactive presentations.



Adopted: 2017

BIG IDEAS

  • Convincing arguments include facts, statistics, examples, and logical reasoning. (6.2c)
  • In evaluating the legitimacy of a presentation, knowing the difference between fact and opinion helps the audience determined what is to be believed and what is just someone's perspective. (6.2a)
  • Comparing and contrasting ideas found in multiple sources allows one to identify conflicting and consistent information and thus effectively evaluate the legitimacy of information and sources. (6.2b)
  • Comparing and contrasting viewpoints gives one a more comprehensive view of a topic. (6.2b)
  • Knowing the audience determines the content to be presented as well as the language and visuals to include. (6.2e and 6.2b)
  • To effectively engage an audience, it is critical to present using the appropriate language and tone. (6.2e and 6.2a,b)
  • Career growth and outshining the competition often involve being an effective presenter. (6.2c)
  • Effective presentation skills reduce miscommunications. (6.2c)
  • Presentation skills are important to public image and opinion. (6.2c)

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will refine and apply critical listening skills while participating in oral presentations as both the speaker and members of the audience.
  • Students will present convincing arguments and compare and contrast viewpoints.
  • Students will paraphrase and summarize what they have heard, using grammatically correct language and appropriate vocabulary.

All students should

  • understand that each member brings a unique viewpoint to the group
  • understand nonverbal communication and its impact and use it purposefully
  • understand that using more than one communication mode creates a more effective presentation.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • recognize that facts can be verified and that opinions cannot.
  • recognize that each member brings to the group a unique viewpoint reflective of his or her background.
  • paraphrase by putting into their own words what has been said by others.
  • paraphrase and summarize by restating the main points more succinctly than the original presentation.
  • organize a presentation.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • take notes to record facts/opinions or differing viewpoints.
  • organize convincing arguments to include:
    • facts;
    • statistics;
    • examples; and
    • logical reasoning.
  • paraphrase or summarize what others have said.
  • plan and deliver an oral presentation, using the following steps:
    • determine topic and purpose;
    • identify the intended audience;
    • gather information;
    • organize the information;
    • use multimedia to clarify presentation information;
    • choose vocabulary appropriate to topic, purpose, and audience;
    • phrase with grammatically correct language; and
    • practice delivery.
  • use strategies for summarizing, such as the following:
    • delete trivial and redundant information;
    • substitute a general term for a list; and
  • find or create a main idea statement.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • create a presentation that uses two or more communication modes to make meaning (e.g., still or moving images, gestures, spoken language and written language)
  • plan and deliver a multimodal presentation using the following steps:
    • determine topic and purpose
    • identify the intended audience
    • choose vocabulary appropriate to topic, purpose, and audience
  • demonstrate appropriate eye contact with listeners
  • speak clearly at an understandable pace with appropriate tone and volume
  • use acceptable posture according to the setting and the audience.

Updated: May 30, 2018

Reading

The student will read and learn the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.

a)  Identify word origins and derivations.

b)  Use roots, cognates, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.

c)  Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.

d)  Identify and analyze figurative language.  

e) Use word-reference materials.

f)  Extend general and specialized vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.


The student will read and determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.

a) Identify word origins and derivations.

b) Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.

c) Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.

d) Identify and analyze the construction and impact of figurative language.

e) Use word-reference materials.

f) Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.


Adopted: 2017

BIG IDEAS

  • Understanding word structures  and origins and derivations helps to show relationships among words. (6.4a and 6.4a)
  • Many words are like Legos; they can be pulled apart and reassembled with other parts to make new words. (6.4b and 6.4b)
  • Many words have multiple meanings, and understanding the context as well as the dictionary definitions can help determine which meaning is appropriate. (6.4c,e and 6.4c,e)
  • Understanding words parts helps readers decode and understand the meanings of words more quickly and accurately. (6.4b and 6.4b)
  • Synonyms and antonyms can make meaning more precise when words are chosen not only for their denotative meanings but for their connotative meanings as well. (6.4b,c and 6.4b,c)
  • Figurative language is used by authors in part to make unfamiliar objects, settings, and situations more relatable to readers. (6.4d and 6.4d)
  • Word reference materials allows readers to determine or confirm word meanings, including their connotations, denotations, and etymologies. (6.4e and 6.4e)
  • Most professions and areas of study have specialized vocabularies that are specific to them. (6.4f and 6.4f)



UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will become independent learners of vocabulary. Teachers should choose vocabulary from context.
  • Students will be exposed to prefixes, suffixes, roots, derivations, and inflections of polysyllabic words and understand that words with similar parts may be related to each other in meaning and origin.
  • Teachers should use a study of cognates, words from the same linguistic family, to enhance vocabulary instruction Cognates can occur within the same language or across languages— night (English), nuit (French), Nacht (German), nacht (Dutch), nicht (Scots), natt (Swedish, Norwegian), nat (Danish), raat (Urdu), nátt (Faroese), nótt (Icelandic), noc (Czech, Slovak, Polish).
  • Figurative language will be introduced and, students will continue the use of context to help determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • Students will be introduced to wordrelationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used as figurative language.
  • Students will develop independence with reference books to determine meaning, pronunciation, and origin of words.


All students should

  • understand that word structure can be analyzed to show relationships among words
  • understand that affixes and Greek and Latin roots are clues to determine meanings of words
  • recognize that many words have multiple meanings and that context and dictionaries are both supportive in determining which meaning is most appropriate
  • recognize that figurative language enriches text.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • use word structure to analyze and show relationships among words.
  • use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to determine meanings of common English words.
  • recognize that many words have multiple meanings and that context and dictionaries are both supportive in determining which meaning is most appropriate.
  • recognize that figurative language enriches text.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • use common Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., aud –  hearing, listening, or sound audience, auditory, audible.
  • identify Latin and Greek roots of common English words  as clues to the meaning.
  • separate and recombine known word parts to predict the meaning of unfamiliar words, such as separating poly from polygon and phone from telephone to predict the meaning of polyphony.
  • recognize common antonyms and synonyms.
  • notice relationships among inflected words, such as proceed and procession or internal and internalization.
  • use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning.
  • recognize word relationships, such as:
    • synonyms – small: little;
    • antonyms – up: down;
    • object/action – ear: hear;
    • source/product – tree: lumber;
    • part/whole – paw: dog; and
    • animal/habitat – bee: hive.
  • use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words in text, such as:
    • examples;
    • restatements; and
    • contrast.
  • identify figurative language in text, including:
    • simile – figures of speech that use the words like or as to make comparisons;
    • hyperbole – intentionally exaggerated figures of speech; and
    • metaphor – a comparison equating two or more unlike things without using “like” or “as.”
  • consult word reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses, both print and online) to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its meaning.
  • determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on reading and content.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • use common Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., aud –  hearing, listening, or sound audience, auditory, audible)
  • separate and recombine known word parts to predict the meaning of unfamiliar words, such as separating poly from polygon and phone from telephone to predict the meaning of polyphony
  • use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words in text, such as examples, restatements, and contrast
  • identify figurative language in text, including simile, hyperbole, and personification
  • consult word reference materials to find the pronunciation of a word or to determine or clarify its meaning
  • determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on reading and content.

KEY VOCABULARY

Updated: May 31, 2018

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.

  e)  Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information. 

  g)  Identify main idea.

  h)  Summarize supporting details.

  i)  Compare and contrast information about one topic, which may be contained in different selections.

  l)  Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.

b) Identify main idea.

c) Summarize supporting details.

d) Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.

 j) Analyze ideas within and between selections, providing textual evidence.

k) Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.


Adopted: 2017

BIG IDEAS

  • Making inferences is like being a detective.  Readers must use their prior knowledge to find the meanings behind what is written in a passage. (6.6e and 6.6e)
  • Rather than being explicit, writers sometimes imply a main idea or theme, and it is up to the reader to figure out the main idea or theme by inferencing and drawing conclusions. (6.6e and 6.6e)
  • To be able to summarize a reader must be able to identify the main idea. (6.6g and 6.6b)
  • The main idea is the glue that holds all of the details in a passage together. (6.6g and 6.6b)
  • The degree to which a reader will comprehend and/or support the main idea or proposition of a passage will depend on the details that are used to support that idea or proposition. (6.6h and 6.6c)
  • Summarizing demonstrates one's ability to identify the most important ideas in a text, distinguish relevant from irrelevant details, and integrate ideas in a meaningful way. (6.6d)
  • Reading strategies are deliberate mental actions that allow readers to better comprehend and remember textual information. (6.6l and 6.6k)
  • Comparing and contrasting ideas about one topic found in multiple sources allow a reader to identify conflicting and consistent information and thus evaluate the validity of sources. (6.6i and 6.6j)
  • Comparing and contrasting viewpoints gives a more comprehensive view of a topic. (6.6i and 6.6j)

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will read and comprehend at and beyond the literal level in a variety of nonfiction texts.
  • Teachers will model higher-order thinking processes with materials at the students’ instructional reading level and move students gradually to collaborative and independent comprehension of age-appropriate materials at the independent reading level.
  • Students will become independent and knowledgeable about the use of libraries and technology for doing research.
  • Teachers will collaborate to help students apply reading skills in a variety of content texts.
  • Students will use a variety of reading strategies such as text annotation, QAR (Question-Answer Relationship), thinking aloud, etc.

All students should

  • recognize an author’s use of technical vocabulary
  • understand that all texts contain messages stated or implied by an author
  • understand that there are strategies including context, structural analysis, and reference sources, for determining the meaning of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary
  • understand that skilled readers of nonfictional texts apply different reading strategies.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • activate prior knowledge before reading.
  • be strategic before, during, and after reading.
  • recognize an author’s patterns of organization.
  • recognize an author’s use and clarification of technical vocabulary.
  • use graphic organizers to organize and summarize text.
  • read beyond the printed text to understand the message stated or implied by an author.
  • select appropriate sources of information based on the purpose for reading.
  • use a variety of strategies, including context, structural analysis, and reference sources, for determining the meaning of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary.
  • read in order to gather, organize, and synthesize information for written and oral presentations.
  • recognize an author’s purpose, including:
    • to entertain;
    • to inform; and
    • to persuade.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • activate prior knowledge before reading by use of, but not limited to:
    • small-group or whole-class discussion;
    • anticipation guides; and
    • preview of key vocabulary
  • pose questions prior to and during the reading process based on text structures, such as:
    • boldface and/or italics type;
    • type set in color;
    • vocabulary;
    • graphics or photographs; and
    • headings and subheadings.
  • use specific and helpful clues in the context, including:
    • definitions – which define words within the text;
    • signal words – which alert readers that explanations or examples follow;
    • direct explanations – which explain terms as they are introduced;
    • synonyms – which provide a more commonly used term;
    • antonyms – which contrast words with their opposites; and
    • inferences – which imply meaning and help readers deduce meaning.
  • give evidence from the text to support conclusions.
  • identify common patterns of organizing text including:
    • chronological or sequential;
    • comparison/contrast;
    • cause and effect;
    • problem-solution; and
    • generalization or principle.
  • predict and then read to validate or revise the prediction(s).
  • identify clue words and phrases that help unlock meaning of unfamiliar and technical terms.
  • comprehend and record details and/or facts in order to arrive at a conclusion, inference, or generalization.
  • recognize that a fact is something that can be proven, while an opinion is a personal feeling.
  • determine a central idea of a text and recognize how details support that idea.
  • use graphic organizers to show similarities and differences in the information found in several sources about the same topic.
  • use strategies and rules for summarizing, such as the following:
    • delete trivia and redundancy;
    • substitute a general term for a list; and
    • find or create a main idea statement.
  • summarize the text without providing a personal opinion.
  • compare and contrast similar information across several texts.


To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • use context, structural analysis, and reference sources to determine the meaning of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary
  • identify similarities and differences in the information found in several sources about the same topic
  • use strategies and rules for summarizing, such as
    • delete trivia and redundancy
    • substitute a general term for a list
    • find or create a main idea statement
  • summarize the text without providing a personal opinion
  • demonstrate comprehension and apply strategies to write about what is read

KEY VOCABULARY

boldface and/or italics type; type set in color; vocabulary; graphics or photographs; headings and subheadings; signal words;  direct explanations;  synonyms;  antonyms;  inferences; chronological or sequential; comparison/contrast; cause and effect; problem-solution; generalization or principle; fact vs. opinion; central idea


Analyze

Implied

Nonfiction text

Objective
Updated: Jun 12, 2018

Writing

The student will write narration, description, exposition, and persuasion.

  a)  Identify audience and purpose.  

  b)  Use a variety of prewriting strategies including graphic organizers to generate and organize ideas.

  c)  Organize writing structure to fit mode or topic.

  d)  Establish a central idea and organization.

  e)  Compose a topic sentence or thesis statement if appropriate.

  f)  Write multiparagraph compositions with elaboration and unity.

  g)  Select vocabulary and information to enhance the central idea, tone, and voice.

  h)  Expand and embed ideas by using modifiers, standard coordination, and subordination in complete sentences.

  i)  Revise sentences for clarity of content including specific vocabulary and information.

  j)  Use computer technology to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writing.

The student will write in a variety of forms, to include narrative, expository, persuasive, and reflective, with an emphasis on narrative and reflective writing

a) Engage in writing as a recursive process.

b) Choose audience and purpose.

c) Use a variety of prewriting strategies to generate and organize ideas.

d) Organize writing to fit mode or topic.

e) Write narratives to include characters, plot, setting, and point of view.

f) Establish a central idea, incorporating evidence and maintaining an organized structure.

g) Compose a thesis statement for expository and persuasive writing.

h) Write multiparagraph compositions with elaboration and unity.

i) Use transition words and phrases.

j) Select vocabulary and information to enhance the central idea, tone, and voice.

k) Expand and imbed ideas by using modifiers, standard coordination, and subordination in complete sentences.

l) Revise writing for clarity of content including specific vocabulary and information.


Adopted: 2017

BIG IDEAS

  • Knowing the purpose and audience for a piece of text not only helps writers know what to say but also how to say it. (6.7a and 6.7b)
  • The purpose and intended audience for a piece of text can impact the choice of text structure. (6.7a and 6.7b)
  • To effectively engage an intended audience, it is critical to use appropriate language and tone. (6.7a and 6.7b)
  • Prewriting makes the writing process more efficient. (6.7b and 6.7c)
  • Prewriting involves choosing a topic, considering purpose, identifying the audience, gathering information, and organizing ideas. (6.7b and 6.7c)
  • Prewriting provides a path for a writer to follow. (6.7b and 6.7c)
  • Writing should focus on a central idea around which details will be added. The central idea is the glue that holds the organization of the text together. (6.7d and 6.7f)
  • Author's can organize writing to fit their given purposes and topics. (6.7c and 6.7d)
  • Knowing text structures, transition words, and text features allow writers to organize their thinking to match the structure needed for effective communication and comprehension. (6.7c and 6.7d)
  • A thesis statement controls the subject matter of an essay and states something significant. (6.7e and 6.7g)
  • Like the foundation of a building, a thesis statement or topic sentence provides a base on which all of an essay's ideas will be constructed. (6.7e and 6.7g)
  • Specific vocabulary helps create a writer's tone and enhances the purpose. (6.7g and 6.7j)
  • It is important to select precise words and information for an intended audience. (6.7g and 6.7j)
  • Information to include in an essay should be reasons, descriptions, statistics, facts, examples, explanations, and comparisons to help readers learn more about the thesis statement or topic sentence. (6.7g and 6.7j)
  • Dividing an essay into multiple paragraphs creates an organization that helps readers understand a writer's intent and information.  This is particularly true when the paragraphs follow an established text structure format. (6.7f and 6.7h)
  • Modifiers, such as adjectives and adverbs, are used to add emphasis, explanation, or detail to a particular word in sentences. (6.7h and 6.7k)
  • Modifiers make writing more descriptive and engaging. (6.7h and 6.7k)
  • Coordination and subordination allow authors to write more sophisticated text by combining words, phrases, and clauses into more complex forms. (6.7h and 6.7k)
  • Coordination allows two ideas of equal value to be joined. (6.7h and 6.7k)
  • Subordination joins two ideas in a way that makes one more important than the other. (6.7h and 6.7k)
  • Using modifies, coordination, and subordination allows authors to incorporate variety into their writing. (6.7h and 6.7k)
  • Editing is proofreading text to correct errors in grammar and mechanics, whereas revising involves improvements in logic, clarity, flow, organization, and quality of evidence. (6.7i and 6.7l)
  • Rewriting allows one to learn how to write better as well as improving reading and analytical skills. (6.7i and 6.7l)
  • Revision is the opportunity to step back and re-envision text.  An author thinks about the goal of an essay and whether or not that goal was successfully accomplished. (6.7i and 6.7l)
  • Rather than being linear, the process of writing is recursive where writers may jump between steps in the process and revisit previous steps as needed. (6.7a)
  • Transition words and phrases not only show readers connections between ideas but also prevent awkward mental leaps between sentences and paragraphs. (6.7i)
  • Using technology can make progressing through the writing process quicker and more efficient. (6.7j)

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will demonstrate an awareness of audience and use a process for writing as they produce narrative, descriptive, expository, and persuasive pieces.
  • Teachers will focus direct instruction on all three domains of writing:
    • composing – the structuring and elaborating a writer does to construct an effective message for readers;
    • written expression – those features that show the writer purposefully shaping and controlling language to affect readers; and
    • usage/mechanics – the features that cause written language to be acceptable and effective for standard discourse.
  • Students will apply a process for writing, including planning, drafting, revising, proofreading, editing, and publishing.
  • Good writing includes elaboration, i.e., use of descriptive details and examples, within sentences to give detail and depth to an idea and across paragraphs to continue the flow of an idea throughout a piece.
  • Voice shows an author’s personality, awareness of audience, and passion for his or her subject. It adds liveliness and energy to writing.
  • Tone is used to express an author’s attitude toward the topic.
  • The writing process is nonlinear: returning to prewriting strategies or drafting at any point in the process may help the writer clarify and elaborate a drafted piece.
  • Students should have practice writing on demand, for shorter time frames, and over  extended periods of time.

All students should

  • understand that writing requires a recursive process that includes planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing
  • understand that writing should be purposefully crafted with attention to
    • deliberate word choice
    • precise information and vocabulary
    • sentence variety
    • tone and voice
  • understand that vocabulary impacts tone and must be selected with awareness of audience and purpose
  • understand that a thesis statement is not an announcement of the subject (statement of intent) but rather a unified and specific statement.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • use prewriting strategies to select and narrow topics.
  • compose with attention to:
    • central idea;
    • unity;
    • elaboration; and
    • organization.
  • craft writing purposefully with attention to:
    • deliberate word choice;
    • precise information and
  •   vocabulary;
    • sentence variety; and
    • tone and voice.
  • elaborate writing to continue the flow from idea to idea without interruption.
  • use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
  • select vocabulary and tone with awareness of audience and purpose.
  • revise drafts for improvement, using teacher assistance, peer collaboration, and growing independence.
  • recognize that a thesis statement is not an announcement of the subject, but rather a unified, and specific statement. 

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences when writing narratives.
  • engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
  • use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  • write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information.
  • write using strategies such as definition, classification comparison/contrast, and cause/effect.
  • include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when appropriate.
  • develop the topic using  relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, and/or examples.
  • use transitional words or phrases to connect parts of sentences in order to:
    • show relationships between ideas;
    • signal a shift or change in the writer's thoughts;
    • signal levels of importance;
    • suggest a pattern of organization; and
    • make sentences clearer.
  • establish and maintain a formal style of writing when appropriate.
  • provide an appropriate conclusion for the purpose and mode of writing.
  • identify audience and purpose for any piece of writing.
  • use selected prewriting techniques, such as:
    • brainstorming;
    • webbing;
    • mapping;
    • clustering;
    • listing;
    • organizing graphically;
    • questioning; and
    • outlining.
  • write using descriptive details.
  • elaborate to:
    • give detail;
    • add depth; and
    • continue the flow of an idea.
  • write an effective thesis statement focusing, limiting, or narrowing the topic.
  • differentiate between a thesis statement and a topic sentence.
  • write more than one paragraph on any central theme or topic demonstrating elaboration, coherence, and unity.
  • incorporate variety into sentences, using appropriate:
    • modifier– an adjective, an adverb, or a phrase or clause acting as an adjective or adverb;
    • coordination – joining words, phrases, clauses, or sentences by using appropriate coordinating conjunctions; and
    • subordination – establishing the relationship between an independent and a dependent clause by using appropriate subordinate conjunctions.
  • understand that revising to improve a draft includes:
    • rereading;
    • reflecting;
    • rethinking; and
    • rewriting.
  • use available computer technology to enhance the writing process.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to 

  • compose with attention to central idea, unity, elaboration, and organization
  • analyze and use mentor texts as models for writing
  • use narrative techniques, such as pacing and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters
  • write reflectively to explain and analyze an experience, a skill, or an event, and as a response to reading
  • recognize that three examples of reflective writing include
    • technical— – which includes what worked or did not work and reasons why, problem-solving techniques, and theories that were used or tested
    • collaborative— – which is centered on team dynamics, how everyone worked together and why, and what worked or did not work and reasons why
    • individual—focused on questions such as, “What did I learn?” “How did I learn it?” and “What could I have done better?”
  • write expository texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information
  • write using organizational patterns such as definition, comparison/contrast, and cause and effect
  • develop the topic using relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, and/or examples
  • use transitional words or phrases to connect parts of sentences to show relationships between ideas, signal a shift or change in the writer's thoughts, signal levels of importance, suggest a pattern of organization, and make sentences clearer
  • establish and maintain a formal style of writing when appropriate
  • provide an appropriate conclusion for the purpose and form of writing
  • identify audience and purpose for any piece of writing
  • elaborate to give detail, add depth, and continue the development of an idea
  • write an effective thesis statement focusing, limiting, or narrowing the topic
  • differentiate between a thesis statement and a topic sentences
  • write on any central theme or topic, demonstrating elaboration, coherence, and unity
  • incorporate variety into sentences, using appropriate modifier, coordination, or subordination
  • revise drafts for improvement using teacher assistance and peer collaboration
  • understand that revising to improve a draft includes rereading, reflecting, rethinking, and rewriting to clarify, elaborate, and make more precise.

Updated: Jun 13, 2018

The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraphing.

a)  Use a variety of graphic organizers, including sentence diagrams, to analyze and improve sentence formation and paragraph  structure.

b)  Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses.

c)  Use pronoun-antecedent agreement to include indefinite pronouns.

d)  Maintain consistent verb tense across paragraphs.

e)  Eliminate double negatives.

f)  Use quotation marks with dialogue.

g)  Choose adverbs to describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

h)  Use correct spelling for frequently used words.

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraphing, and Standard English

a) Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses.

b) Use pronoun-antecedent agreement to include indefinite pronouns.

c) Maintain consistent verb tense across paragraphs.

d) Eliminate double negatives.

e) Use quotation marks with dialogue.

f) Choose adverbs to describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

g) Use correct spelling for frequently used words.

h) Use subordinating and coordinating conjunctions.


Adopted: 2017

BIG IDEAS

  • Subject-verb agreement is important because without it a reader could become confused. (6.8b and 6.8a)
  • The subject-verb pair unifies a sentence.  It can be surrounded by modifiers, phrases, and clauses, but it will still be the basic unit of meaning. (6.8b and 6.8a)
  • Subjects and verbs need to agree in number since they are units that hold the overall meanings of sentences. (6.8b and 6.8a)
  • If a pronoun does not agree with its antecedent in terms of number (singular/plural), person (1st/2nd/3rd), and gender (masculine/feminine/neutral), confusions can arise. (6.8c and 6.8b)
  • It is important to maintain consistent verb tense so readers can follow the progression of ideas and arguments easily. (6.8d and 6.8c)
  • Verb tense allows writers to express the time relationship among ideas and events. (6.8d and 6.8c)
  • Double negatives create confusion because the two negatives cancel each other out.  The sentence sounds negative but is actually positive. (6.8e and 6.8d)
  • Writers use quotation marks to clearly show which words in a passage are dialogue. (6.8f and 6.8e).
  • Adverbs provide extra information about adjectives, verbs, and other adverbs that clarify meaning and enhance imagery. (6.8g and 6.8f)
  • Adverbs provide information to answer questions such as how much? where? when? how often? and how much? (8.6g and 6.8f)
  • Proper spelling facilitates streamlines and effective communication. (8.6h and 6.8g)
  • Coordinating clauses allow writers to connect two ideas of equal importance and subordinating conjunctions allows writers to connect two ideas where one is of lesser value than the other. (8.6h)

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will understand and apply all the conventions of language learned at the elementary school level.
  • Students will maintain correct use of language to enhance writing and to avoid confusing or distracting the reader.
  • Students will understand that the conventions of correct language are an integral part of the writing process and their proper use is a courtesy to the reader.
  • Indefinite pronouns refer to a person(s) or thing(s) not specifically named and include all, any, anyone, both, each, either, everybody, many, none, nothing.
  • A diagram of a sentence is a tool used to increase the understanding of the structure of a sentence.

All students should

  • understand that correct use of language enhances writing and avoids confusing or distracting the reader
  • understand that pronouns need to have recognizable antecedents that agree in number and gender.


ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • proofread and edit drafts with teacher assistance, peer collaboration, and growing independence.
  • differentiate between subjects and objects when choosing pronouns.
  • understand that pronouns need to have recognizable antecedents that agree in number and gender.
  • use reference sources to differentiate among homophones and easily confused words,(e.g., a lot/allot, effect/affect, bored/board).
  • replace colloquial expressions with correct usage (e.g., I could of rode my bike becomes  I could have ridden my bike.).

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • use complete sentences with appropriate punctuation.
  • avoid comma splices and fused sentences.
  • avoid using coordinating conjunctions at the beginning of a sentence (e.g., and, so).
  • diagram sentences with phrases and clauses.
  • use singular verbs with singular subjects and plural verbs with plural subjects (e.g., The driver of the bus aware of children drives very carefully. The students in the class discuss many topics).
  • use reference sources to select the correct spelling and usage of words such as their, there, and they’re.
  • use first person pronouns appropriately in compound subjects and objects (e.g., John and I went to the store. Mother gave presents to Jim and me.).
  • recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).
  • choose adjectives and adverbs appropriately (e.g., He is a good student. He does really well in all his studies).
  • capitalize language classes or classes followed by a number (e.g., French, Algebra II ).
  • capitalize mom and dad only when those titles replace names or are used as proper nouns (e.g., My mom told me to go to bed, and I replied, "No, Mom, I don’t want to.”).
  • punctuate and format dialogue.
  • correctly use the apostrophe for contractions and possessives.
  • maintain a consistent verb tense within sentences and throughout and across paragraphs.
  • eliminate double negatives.
  • correctly use quotation marks in dialogue.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • edit drafts with teacher assistance, peer collaboration, and growing independence
  • use complete sentences with appropriate punctuation
  • avoid comma splices and run-on sentences
  • avoid using coordinating conjunctions at the beginning of a sentence (e.g., andso)
  • use first-person pronouns appropriately in compound subjects and objects
  • differentiate between subjects and objects when choosing pronouns
  • recognize and correct vague pronouns
  • maintain a consistent verb tense within sentences and throughout and across paragraphs.

Updated: Jun 14, 2018

Research

The student will find, evaluate, and select appropriate resources for a research product.

  a)  Collect information from multiple sources including online, print, and media.

  b)  Evaluate the validity and authenticity of texts.

  c)  Use technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate, and communicate information.

  d)  Cite primary and secondary sources.

  e)  Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.


The student will find, evaluate, and select appropriate resources to create a research product.

a) Formulate and revise questions about a research topic.

b) Collect and organize information from multiple sources.

c) Evaluate and analyze the validity and credibility of sources.

d) Cite primary and secondary sources.

e) Avoid plagiarism by using own words and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.

f) Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.


Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

  • Plagiarism deprives the original author of due credit for his or her work; it is a form of intellectual theft. (6.9e and 6.9e)
  • It is important to properly cite the words and ideas of others. (6.9e and 6.9e)
  • Knowing the purpose for a text helps readers evaluate the validity of the text. (6.9b and 6.9c)
  • Understanding the qualifications of a writer, helps a reader evaluate the validity and usefulness of a text. (6.9b and 6.9c)
  • Viewpoint and purpose affect how an author shapes and develops ideas.  It drives the information that is included and word choices.  Viewing the topic through the author's eyes aids the reader in evaluating a text. (6.9b and 6.9c)
  • Collecting information from multiple sources allows a reader to identify conflicting and consistent information and thus evaluate the authenticity and validity of sources. (6.8a, b and 6.9b, c)
  • Comparing and contrasting viewpoints on a topic gives a reader a more comprehensive view of a topic. (6.9a and 6.9b)
  • Technology can enhance the ability to research, collect, organize, synthesize, evaluate, share, and present information. (6.9c)
  • To give proper credit, strengthen a position, and show diligence in research, good writers utilize and cite both primary and secondary resources. (6.9d)
  • Formulating a good research question is important because it provides a foundation for research.  (6.9a)
  • Using the Internet ethically involves avoiding stealing (plagiarism), avoiding untruthfulness, and avoiding cruelty. (6.9f)

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Students must realize in order to avoid plagiarism, credit must be given when using: another person’s idea, opinion, or theory; facts, statistics, graphs, drawings, etc., quotations of another person’s actual spoken or written words; or paraphrase of another person’s spoken or written words.
  • Teachers should assist students in determining the authenticity and validity of sources.
  • Teachers should make students aware of possible consequences of plagiarism.
  • Students will have the opportunity to practice writing over shorter time frames as well as for extended ones.

All students should

  • Understand that research questions may need to be broadened or narrowed based on available sources
  • understand that a primary source is an original document or a firsthand or eyewitness account of an event
  • understand that a secondary source discusses information originally presented somewhere else (i.e., secondary sources provide analysis, interpretation, or evaluation of the original information)
  • understand the purposeful and responsible use of the Internet 
  • understand that there are consequences of plagiarism according to the guidelines established by local school divisions.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • understand that a primary source is an original document or a firsthand or eyewitness account of an event.
  • understand that a secondary source discusses information originally presented somewhere else. Secondary sources provide analysis, interpretation, or evaluation of the original information.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • understand and use the online, print, and media references available in the classroom, school, and public libraries, including:
    • general and specialized dictionaries;
    • thesauruses and glossaries;
    • general and specialized encyclopedias;
    • directories;
    • general and specialized (or subject-specific) databases; and
    • Internet resources, as appropriate for school use.
  • evaluate the validity and authenticity of texts, using questions, such as:
    • Does the source appear in a reputable publication?
    • Is the source free from bias? 
    • Does the writer have something to gain from his opinion?
    • Does the information contain facts for support?
    • Is the same information found in more than one source?
  • prevent plagiarism and its consequences by giving credit to authors when idea and/or words are used in research.
  • differentiate between a primary and secondary source.
  • provide a list of sources using  a standard form for documenting primary and secondary sources.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • understand and use online, print, and media references
  • evaluate the validity and credibility of texts, using questions, such as
    • Does the writer have something to gain from his opinion?
    • Does the information contain facts for support?
    • Is the same information found in more than one source?
    • Is contact information provided?
    • Is there a copyright symbol on the page?
    • What is the purpose of the page?
    • What is the date of the most recent publication?
  • avoid plagiarism and its consequences by giving credit whenever using another person’s media, facts, statistics, graphics, images, music and sounds, quotations, or when paraphrasing another person’s words
  • differentiate between a primary and secondary source
  • provide a list of sources using a standard form for documenting primary and secondary sources.

Updated: Jun 25, 2018