Science - 2018-19

3.7 - Soil

The student will investigate and understand the major components of soil, its origin, and its importance to plants and animals including humans. Key concepts include

a)  soil provides the support and nutrients necessary for plant growth;

  • observe and recognize that soil, as a natural resource, provides the support and nutrients necessary for plant growth  Bloom's Level:  Understand
  • understand the key terminology related to soil, including humus, nutrients, topsoil, and bedrock  Bloom's Level: Understand
  • design an investigation to compare how different types of soil affect plant growth. This includes organizing data in tables and constructing simple graphs. Bloom's Level:  Create 

b)  topsoil is a natural product of subsoil and bedrock;

  • interpret and illustrate a basic diagram showing major soil layers, including bedrock, subsoil, and topsoil.  Bloom's Level: Analyze
  • explain how soil forms over time.  Bloom's Level: Understand / Apply

c)  rock, clay, silt, sand, and humus are components of soils; and

  • analyze and describe the different components of soil, including rock fragments, clay, silt, sand, and humus.  Bloom's Level: Analyze / Understand

d)  soil is a natural resource and should be conserved.

  • collect, chart, and analyze data on soil conservation on the school grounds.  Bloom's Level: Create / Analysis
  • evaluate the importance of soil to people.  Bloom's Level: Evaluate
  • describe how soil can be conserved.  Bloom's Level: Understand

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

Soil is an important natural resource

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Soil is important because many plants grow in soil, and it provides support and nutrients for the plants.
  • Over many years, weather, water, and living organisms help break down rocks and create soil (weathering).
  • Nutrients are materials that plants and animals need to live and grow.
  • Rock, clay, silt, sand, and humus are components of soil.
  • Topsoil is the upper soil surface and a natural product of subsoil and bedrock. Topsoil is best for plant growth.
  • Subsoil and bedrock are layers of soil under the topsoil that are formed over a long period of time by the action of water.
  • Subsoil and bedrock are not as good for growing plants as is topsoil.
  • Humus is decayed matter in soil. It adds nutrients to the soil. It is located in the topsoil.
  • Clay contains tiny particles of soil that hold water well and provides nutrients.
  • Sand is made up of small grains of worn-down rock, has few nutrients, and does not hold water well.
  • Silt is made up of very small broken pieces of rock. Its particles are larger than clay and smaller than sand.
  • Since soil takes a long time to form, it should be conserved, not wasted.

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  How is soil important?

·  Where does soil come from?

·  How are soils different?

·  What happens if we don't conserve soil?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • observe and recognize that soil, as a natural resource, provides the support and nutrients necessary for plant growth.
  • understand the key terminology related to soil, including humus, nutrients, topsoil, and bedrock.
  • interpret and illustrate a basic diagram showing major soil layers, including bedrock, subsoil, and topsoil.
  • analyze and describe the different components of soil, including rock fragments, clay, silt, sand, and humus.
  • explain how soil forms over time.
  • design an investigation to compare how different types of soil affect plant growth. This includes organizing data in tables and constructing simple graphs.
  • collect, chart, and analyze data on soil conservation on the school grounds.
  • evaluate the importance of soil to people.
  • describe how soil can be conserved.

KEY VOCABULARY

analyze

bedrock

chart

clay

collect

compare

conservation

conserve

design

evaluate

fragments

humus

illustrate

interpret

natural resource

nutrients

observe

plant growth

profile

rock

rock

sand

silt

soil

soil layers

subsoil

support

topsoil

weathering


Updated: May 20, 2016