Science - 2018-19

3.5 - Food Chain

The student will investigate and understand relationships among organisms in aquatic and terrestrial food chains. Key concepts include

a)  producer, consumer, decomposer;

  • distinguish among producers, consumers, herbivores, omnivores, carnivores, and decomposers.  Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • infer that most food chains begin with a green plant.  Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • create and interpret a model of a food chain showing producers and consumers.  Bloom's Level:  Create / Analyze

b)  herbivore, carnivore, omnivore; and

  • identify sequences of feeding relationships in a food chain.  Bloom's Level:  Understand
  • explain how a change in one part of a food chain might affect the rest of the food chain.  Bloom's Level:  Understand

c)  predator and prey.

  • differentiate between predators and prey.  Bloom's Level:  Analyze


Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

In their environments, relationships among living things help them survive.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • A food chain shows a food relationship among plants and animals in a specific area or environment.
  • Terrestrial organisms are found on land habitats such as deserts, grasslands, and forests. Aquatic organisms are found in water habitats such as ponds, marshes, swamps, rivers, and oceans.
  • A green plant makes its own food using sunlight, air, and water. Green plants are producers.
  • A consumer is an animal that eats living organisms (plant or animal).
  • Certain organisms break down decayed plants and animals into smaller pieces that can be used again by other living organisms. These organisms are decomposers.
  • A food chain, which shows part of a food web, can have an animal that eats only plants (herbivore). It can have an animal that eats only other animals (carnivore). It can also have an animal that eats both plants and animals (omnivore).
  • An animal can hunt other animals to get its food (predator).
  • An animal can be hunted by another animal for food (prey).


ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  How does a food chain show relationships within a specific habitat?

·  How can one part of the food chain affect the rest of the food chain?

·  How do living things depend on one another?

·  How does a change in the food chain affect the food chain?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • differentiate between predators and prey.
  • distinguish among producers, consumers, herbivores, omnivores, carnivores, and decomposers.
  • infer that most food chains begin with a green plant.
  • identify sequences of feeding relationships in a food chain.
  • explain how a change in one part of a food chain might affect the rest of the food chain.
  • create and interpret a model of a food chain showing producers and consumers.

KEY VOCABULARY

affect

carnivore

change

consumer

decomposer

distinguish

food chain

green plants

habitat

herbivore

identify

infer

interact

model

omnivore

predator

prey

producer

sequence


Updated: May 20, 2016