Science - 2018-19

3.4 - Adaptations

The student will investigate and understand that adaptations allow animals to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment.  Key concepts include

a)  behavioral adaptations; and

  • give examples of methods that animals use to gather and store food, find shelter, defend themselves, and rear young. Bloom's Level:  Understand
  • describe and explain the terms camouflage, mimicry, hibernation,migration, dormancy, instinct, and learned behavior.  Bloom's Level:  Knowledge / Understand
  • explain how an animal's behavioral adaptations help it live in its specific habitat. Bloom's Level:  Understand
  • distinguish between physical and behavioral adaptations of animals  Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • compare and contrast instinct and learned behavior.  Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • design and construct a model of a habitat for an animal with a specific adaptation. Bloom's Level:  Create

b)  physical adaptations.

  • give examples of methods that animals use to gather and store food, find shelter, defend themselves, and rear young. Bloom's Level:  Understand
  • distinguish between physical and behavioral adaptations of animals  Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • compare the physical characteristics of animals, and explain how the animals are adapted to a certain environment.  Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • create (model) a camouflage pattern for an animal living in a specific dry-land or water-related environment. (Relates to 3.6.)  Bloom's Level:  Create
  • design and construct a model of a habitat for an animal with a specific adaptation.  Bloom's Level:  Create

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

Behaviors and physical adaptations help animals survive.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • In order to survive, animals act in different ways to gather and store food, find shelter, defend themselves, and rear their young.
  • Physical adaptations help animals survive in their environment (e.g., camouflage, mimicry).
  • Various animals possess adaptations which help them blend into their environments to protect themselves from enemies (camouflage). Camouflage is the means by which animals escape the notice of predators, usually because of a resemblance to their surroundings using coloration or outer coverage patterns.
  • Mimicry occurs when a species has features similar to another species.  Either one or both are protected when a third species cannot tell them apart.  (Mimicry happens in both animal and plant species.) Some animals look like other animals to avoid being eaten (mimicry). This adaptation helps protect them from their predators. (For example, the viceroy butterfly tastes good to birds, but the monarch butterfly tastes bad. Because the viceroy looks like the monarch butterfly, it is safer from predators.)  Mimicry can also occur as mimicked behaviors, mimicked sounds, or mimicked scents.
  • Behavioral adaptations allow animals to respond to life needs. Examples include hibernation, migration, dormancy, instinct, and learned behavior.
  • Some animals (e.g., groundhogs, black bears) go into a deep sleep in which their body activities slow down due to seasonal changes and they can live off stored food (hibernation). Hibernation is a condition of biological rest or inactivity where growth, development, and metabolic processes slow down.
  • Some animals (e.g., geese, monarch butterflies, tundra swans) go on a long-distance journey from one place to another (migration) in search of a new temporary habitat because of climate, availability of food, season of the year, or reproduction. 
  • Dormancy is a state of reduced metabolic activity adopted by many organisms (both plants and animals) under conditions of environmental stress or, when such stressful conditions are likely to appear, as in winter.
  • Some animals are born with natural behaviors that they need in order to survive in their environments (instincts). These behaviors are not learned but are instinctive, such as a beaver building a dam or a spider spinning a web.
  • Some behaviors need to be taught in order for the animal to survive, such as a bear cub learning to hunt (learned behavior).

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

· How do instincts help animals?

· How do behavioral and physical adaptations help animals survive?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • give examples of methods that animals use to gather and store food, find shelter, defend themselves, and rear young.
  • describe and explain the terms camouflage, mimicry, hibernation,migration, dormancy, instinct, and learned behavior.
  • explain how an animal’s behavioral adaptations help it live in its specific habitat.
  • distinguish between physical and behavioral adaptations of animals.
  • compare the physical characteristics of animals, and explain how the animals are adapted to a certain environment.
  • compare and contrast instinct and learned behavior.
  • create (model) a camouflage pattern for an animal living in a specific dry-land or water-related environment. (Relates to 3.6.)
  • design and construct a model of a habitat for an animal with a specific adaptation.


KEY VOCABULARY

animal

behavioral adaptation

camouflage

compare

contrast

defend

design

dormancy

gather and store food

habitat

hibernation

instinct

learned behavior

migration

mimicry

model

pattern

physical adaptation

physical characteristics

rear young

shelter


Updated: May 20, 2016