Science - 2018-19

2.8 - Plant Products

The student will investigate and understand that plants produce oxygen and food, are a source of useful products, and provide benefits in nature. Key concepts include

a)  important plant products are identified and classified;

  • classify and identify the sources and uses of plant products, such as fiber, cotton, oil, spices, lumber, rubber, medicines, and paper. Bloom's Level: Understand / Apply
  • describe plant products grown in Virginia that are useful to people, including wood, fruits, and vegetables. List and classify plant products (e.g., peanuts, cotton, soybeans, apples, evergreens). Bloom's Level: Understand

b)  the availability of plant products affects the development of a geographic area;

  • describe how the availability of certain plant products in a geographic area would affect the development of that area. Bloom's Level: Understand / Analyze

c)  plants provide oxygen, homes, and food for many animals; and

  • understand that plants produce oxygen and food.  Bloom's Level: Understand
  • compare and contrast different ways animals use plants as homes and shelters.  Bloom's Level: Analyze
  • construct and interpret a chart illustrating the plant foods consumed by different animals. Bloom's Level: Create / Analyze

d)  plants can help reduce erosion.

  • construct and interpret a model that demonstrates how plants reduce soil erosion.Bloom's Level: Create / Analyze


Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

Plants are an important resource for people and in nature.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Plants provide many useful products and materials, which benefit human beings as well as other living organisms.
  • Plant products include such essentials as oxygen and food, as well as materials useful for clothing and shelter.
  • Plants may grow well in certain geographic areas, thus enabling the production of plant products that allow humans to live in and thrive in those areas. 
  • Some examples of plants that grow in Virginia’s geographic regions include:
    •   Coastal Plains (Tidewater):  peanuts, cotton, soybeans;
    •   Piedmont:  apples, tobacco, cabbage;
    •   Blue Ridge Mountains:  evergreens, apples, corn;
    •   Valleys and Ridges:  evergreens, apples, corn; and
    •   Appalachian Plateau:  tobacco.
  • Plants provide homes and food sources for many animals.
  • Plants are important in the prevention of soil erosion.
  • Products from plants include, but are not limited to, cinnamon from the bark of trees; fiber from reeds, grasses and trees; cotton from a cotton plant; spices from various plant parts; lumber from wood; rubber from rubber trees; and medicines (e.g., aloe vera from the aloe plant, quinine from the bark of Cinchona trees found in South America to treat malaria).

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  How are plants important to humans?

·  How are plants important to other living organisms?

·  How are plants important in nature?

·  How does the geographic area of a plant impact human development?

·  What are important examples of useful plants that grow in Virginia's  geographical regions?

·  Why are plants important in the prevention of soil erosion?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • understand that plants produce oxygen and food.
  • classify and identify the sources and uses of plant products, such as fiber, cotton, oil, spices, lumber, rubber, medicines, and paper.
  • describe how the availability of certain plant products in a geographic area would affect the development of that area. 
  • describe plant products grown in Virginia that are useful to people, including wood, fruits, and vegetables. List and classify plant products (e.g., peanuts, cotton, soybeans, apples, evergreens).
  • compare and contrast different ways animals use plants as homes and shelters.
  • construct and interpret a chart illustrating the plant foods consumed by different animals.
  • construct and interpret a model that demonstrates how plants reduce soil erosion.

KEY VOCABULARY

animal

apples

classify

clothing

consume

cotton

cotton

develop

development

erosion

essential

evergreens

fiber

food

fruits

geographic area

home

lumber

material

medicine

model

oil

oxygen

paper

peanuts

plant

prevention

product

resource

rubber

shelter

soil

source

soybeans

spices

use

vegetables

Virginia

wood


Updated: May 20, 2016