Science - 2018-19

2.5 - Habitat

The student will investigate and understand that living things are part of a system. Key concepts include

a)  living organisms are interdependent with their living and nonliving surroundings;

  • classify objects as to whether they are living or nonliving  Bloom's Level: Understand
  • classify the parts of an animal’s habitat as living or nonliving  Bloom's Level: Understand
  • describe how animals are dependent on their surroundings, for example, how squirrels and other animals are affected by the loss of forest habitat.  Bloom's Level: Understand / Analyze

b)  an animal’s habitat includes adequate food, water, shelter or cover, and space;

  • describe the basic components of an animal habitat (food, water, shelter or cover, and space). Bloom's Level: Understand / Apply
  • construct and interpret simple models of different kinds of habitats, including a forest and a stream. Bloom's Level: Create/ Analyze

c)  habitats change over time due to many influences; and

  • predict and describe seasonal changes in habitat and their effects on plants and animals, for example, how trees change through the seasons and how animals respond to changes in the seasons.   Bloom's Level: Understand / Apply

d)  fossils provide information about living systems that were on Earth years ago.

  •  describe how scientists use the study of fossils to show past weather/climate conditions and environmental characteristics.  Bloom's Level: Understand / Apply

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

Living things are part of a system.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Living organisms are dependent on other living organisms and their nonliving surroundings for survival.
  • All of the interactions between and among living organisms and their nonliving surroundings are referred to as a system.
  • Shelter may be living (coral, tree) or nonliving (caves, houses).
  • The habitat of an animal includes adequate food, water, shelter or cover, and space. If any of the basic elements of an animal’s habitat are absent, the animal’s survival is threatened. The animal may adapt or leave the area.
  • The habitats of living organisms, such as forests, grasslands, rivers, and streams, change due to many human or natural influences (e.g., forest fires, hurricanes, and droughts). Habitats change from season to season.
  • Fossils found provide scientists with information about plants and animals that lived on Earth many years ago. (e.g., The rise and fall of sea level is recorded in the richly fossiliferous rocks of Virginia’s coastal plain. An abundance of marine fossils – fossil clams, snails, sand dollars, shark’s teeth, and whalebones – can be found in Virginia’s coastal plains.)
  • Virginia’s state fossil, Chesapecten jeffersonius, is a large extinct species of scallop that dates to approximately 4.5 million years ago. It was the first fossil ever described in North America and is named after Thomas Jefferson, one of our founding fathers, and an amateur paleontologist.

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  How do living organisms interact with other living organisms in their surroundings?

·  How do living organisms interact with non-living things in their surroundings?

·  Why do habitats change over time?

·  What is a system?

·  What do fossils tell us about the living systems on Earth years ago?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • classify objects as to whether they are living or nonliving.
  • describe the basic components of an animal habitat (food, water, shelter or cover, and space).
  • classify the parts of an animal’s habitat as living or nonliving.
  • construct and interpret simple models of different kinds of habitats, including a forest and a stream.
  • predict and describe seasonal changes in habitat and their effects on plants and animals, for example, how trees change through the seasons and how animals respond to changes in the seasons.
  • describe how animals are dependent on their surroundings, for example, how squirrels and other animals are affected by the loss of forest habitat.
  • describe how scientists use the study of fossils to show past weather/climate conditions and environmental characteristics.

KEY VOCABULARY

change

dependent

food

forest

fossil

grassland

habitat

interdependent

living

non-living

organism

river

season

shelter

space

stream

surroundings

survival

system

water


Updated: Oct 09, 2017