Science - 2018-19

2.2 - Magnetism

The student will investigate and understand that natural and artificial magnets have certain characteristics and attract specific types of metals. Key concepts include

a)  magnetism, iron, magnetic/nonmagnetic, poles, attract/repel; and

  • identify the north and south magnetic poles of magnets. Bloom's Level:  Knowledge
  • predict which materials will be attracted to magnets, test the predictions, and create a chart that shows the results, classifying materials as to whether they are attracted to magnets or not. Bloom's Level:  Apply, Create, Understand
  • conduct an investigation to determine how the different poles of magnets react to the poles of other magnets Bloom's Level:  Apply

b)  important applications of magnetism.

  • use magnetic compasses to determine the directions of north and south poles. Bloom's Level:  Apply
  • identify important applications of magnets in everyday life: - refrigerator magnets and chalkboard letters - toys - door latches - paper clip holders - computers - motors - credit card magnetic strips. Bloom's Level:  Apply
  • compare natural magnets (lodestone or magnetite) and artificial magnets. Bloom's Level:  Analyze
  • create a new application for using a magnet.  Bloom's Level:  Create

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

Magnets can be both natural and artificial and are attracted to specific types of metals.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Magnets have a north and a south pole.
  • Unlike magnetic poles attract and like poles repel. The north pole of one magnet attracts the south pole of a second magnet, while the north pole of one magnet repels the other magnet's north pole.
  • A magnet creates an invisible area of magnetism all around it called a magnetic field.
  • The north end of a magnetic compass always points roughly toward Earth's North Pole and the south end of the compass needle always points toward Earth’s South Pole. That is because Earth itself contains magnetic materials and behaves like a gigantic magnet.
  • When a magnetized metal, such as a compass needle, is allowed to swing freely, it displays the interesting property of aligning with Earth’s magnetic fields.
  • A magnet is strongest at its poles.
  • The farther away the magnetic poles are from each other, the weaker the magnetic force.
  • If you cut a bar magnet in half, you get two new, smaller magnets, each with its own north and south pole.
  • Magnets can attract objects made of iron, nickel, or cobalt.
  • Magnets can be artificially made from special metals or can occur naturally. Naturally occurring magnets are composed of a mineral called magnetite or lodestone.
  • Magnets have important applications and uses in everyday life.

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  How do people use magnets?

·  What makes a magnet "magnetic"?

·  What are some characteristics of magnets?

·  What types of metals does a magnet attract?

In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • identify the north and south magnetic poles of magnets.
  • use magnetic compasses to determine the directions of north and south poles.
  • predict which materials will be attracted to magnets, test the predictions, and create a chart that shows the results, classifying materials as to whether they are attracted to magnets or not.
  • conduct an investigation to determine how the different poles of magnets react to the poles of other magnets.
  • identify important applications of magnets in everyday life:
    • refrigerator magnets and chalkboard letters
    • toys
    • door latches
    • paper clip holders
    • computers
    • motors
    • credit card magnetic strips.
  • compare natural magnets (lodestone or magnetite) and artificial magnets.
  • create a new application for using a magnet.

KEY VOCABULARY

artificial magnet

attract

classify

communicate

compass

experiment

iron

lodestone

magnetic

magnetism

magnetite

natural magnet

nickel

nonmagnetic

north pole

observe

poles

predict

repel

south pole


Updated: May 20, 2016