Science - 2018-19

2.7 a - Seasonal Changes

The student will investigate and understand that weather and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings. Key concepts include

a)  effects of weather and seasonal changes on the growth and behavior of living things; and

  • identify growth and behavioral responses of plants and animals to weather and seasonal changes. Examples of responses that are adaptive include migration, hibernation, camouflage, and dormancy. Bloom's Level: Understand /Apply 
  • identify animals that migrate, hibernate, or show other changes throughout the seasons or in the presence of adverse environmental conditions. Bloom's Level: Understand
  • evaluate the usefulness of camouflage in an animal’s habitat (for example, coloration patterns of frogs). Bloom's Level: Analyze / Evaluate
  • compare and contrast the responses of plants and animals to weather and seasonal changes.  Bloom's Level: Analyze


Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

Weather and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • Living organisms respond to weather and seasonal changes. This can be reflected in changes in growth and behavior.
  • Adverse conditions of weather may slow the growth and development of plants and animals, whereas optimal weather conditions may accelerate the growth and development of plants and animals.
  • Dormancy is a state of reduced metabolic activity adopted by many organisms (both plants and animals) under conditions of environmental stress or when such stressful conditions are likely to appear, such as in winter. 
  • Many trees produce new leaves in the spring and lose them in the fall due to seasonal changes in temperature and light.
  • The outward coloration and coloration patterns of many animals are similar in appearance to the plants in the places in which they live. This similarity to background is referred to as camouflage, and it enables animals to hide and avoid those that may eat or harm them.
  • Some animals (e.g., geese, monarch butterflies, tundra swans) travel from one place to another and back again (migration) in search of a new temporary habitat because of climate, availability of food, season of the year, or reproduction. 
  • Some animals (e.g., groundhogs, black bears) go into a deep sleep (hibernation) due to seasonal changes. Hibernation is a condition of biological rest or inactivity where growth, development, and metabolic processes slow down.
  • Some animals undergo physical changes (e.g., thickening of dog fur in the winter and shedding in the summer) from season to season.
  • Land surfaces are subject to the agents of weathering and erosion. Land surfaces that are not covered with or protected by plants are more likely to be subject to the loss of soil by wind and water.
  • Weathering is the breaking down of rocks, which usually happens over long periods of time.
  • Erosion is the process by which the products of weathering are moved from one place to another. Erosion may happen quickly (e.g., during a flood or a hurricane) or over a long period of time.

ESSENTIALS

Essential Questions:

·  What do plants adapt?

· How do animals adapt?


In order to meet this standard, it is expected that students will

  • identify growth and behavioral responses of plants and animals to weather and seasonal changes. Examples of responses that are adaptive include migration, hibernation, camouflage, and dormancy.
  • identify animals that migrate, hibernate, or show other changes throughout the seasons or in the presence of adverse environmental conditions.
  • evaluate the usefulness of camouflage in an animal’s habitat (for example, coloration patterns of frogs).
  • compare and contrast the responses of plants and animals to weather and seasonal changes.
  • model the effects of weathering and erosion on the land surface.

KEY VOCABULARY

adaptation

animals

behavior

camouflage

change

classify

communicate

dormancy

drought

environmental conditions

experiment

flood

growth

habitat

hibernation

migration

observe

plants

precipitation

predict

seasons

weather


Updated: Aug 07, 2015