Social Studies - 2018-19

VUS.14a - Role of the Supreme Court

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

a) assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;


Adopted: 2015

BIG IDEAS

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

Changes in domestic policies and in political and social conditions have impacted the role and membership of the United States Supreme Court.

ESSENTIALS

The membership of the United States Supreme Court during the end of the twentieth century and early twenty-first century has included women and minorities, such as Sandra Day O’Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Clarence Thomas, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan.

The United States Supreme Court protects the individual rights enumerated in the Constitution of the United States.

Right to privacy 

 The United States Supreme Court identifies a constitutional basis for a right to privacy that is protected from government interference.

o Roe v. Wade established the precedent of right to privacy.

o Riley v. California (2014) protects the privacy of digital information on cell phones.

Equal rights 

 The Civil Rights Movement of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s provided a model that other minority groups have used to extend civil rights and promote equal justice.

o Loving v. Virginia (1967) protected equal rights for individuals, struck down state laws that prohibited interracial marriage, and held that marriage was a fundamental right.

o Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona (2013) invalidated a state law requiring proof of citizenship during the voter registration application process.

Rule of law 

 Rule of law is a principle under which all persons, institutions, and entities are accountable to the laws.

o Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) requires states to provide counsel for needy defendants charged with serious offenses.

o Snyder v. Phelps (2011) upholds that protests of public concern are entitled to greater protection under the free speech clause of the First Amendment.


KEY VOCABULARY

Terms & Events

Moral legitimacy

Humanitarian aid

Reunification

Persian Gulf War

Operation Desert Storm

NAFTA 

Sanctions

Apartheid

9/11

War in Afghanistan

War in Iraq

Right to privacy

Enumerated

Protection from government interference

Immigration policy (border issues)

Bilingual education

Citizenship requirements

Recent immigrants

Diversity

Space Exploration

Space Shuttle

Mars Rover

Voyager Missions

Hubble telescope

Satellites

GPS

Robotics

Personal Communication Devices

Telecommuting

Online coursework

Outsourcing

Offshoring

Diagnostic and Medical Imaging

 “Reagan Revolution”

Judicial restraint

Centrist Democrat

Inflation

Monetary policy

Fiscal policy

Expansion and contraction of economy

Gross Domestic Product (GDP)

Economic indicators

Exchange rates

Rate of inflation

Patriot Act (USA PATRIOT Act)

Military Initiatives

Diplomatic Initiatives

Homeland security

International terrorism

People

William J. Clinton

George W. Bush

George H.W. Bush

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Clarence Thomas

Sally Ride 

Dr. Jonas Salk

Sandra Day O’Connor

Ronald Reagan

William J. Clinton

George H.W. Bush

George W. Bush

Places

Germany

Yugoslavia

Eastern Europe

Vietnam

South Africa

Supreme Court Cases

Roe v. Wade

Riley v. California (2014)

Civil Rights Movement of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s

Loving v. Virginia (1967)

Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona (2013)

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Snyder v. Phelps (2011)

rule of law

Updated: May 18, 2018