Social Studies - 2018-19

VUS.7b - Emancipation Proclamation & Gettysburg Address

The student will apply social science skills to understand the Civil War and Reconstruction eras and their significance as major turning points in American history by

b) evaluating and explaining the significance and development of Abraham Lincoln’s leadership and political statements, including the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation and the principles outlined in the Gettysburg Address;


Adopted: 2015

BIG IDEAS

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

Abraham Lincoln’s vision of the United States as a nation and democratic society was evident in his speeches and political decrees.

ESSENTIALS

Abraham Lincoln’s leadership

•   Believed secession was an illegal act and that the United States was a “nation,” not a 

collection of sovereign states;

Southerners believed the states had freely joined the Union and could freely leave

•   First Inaugural Address: “In your hands my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is 

the momentous issue of civil war…”

•    Initial goal: Preserve the Union

•    Later goal: End slavery and expand citizenship

Emancipation Proclamation

•     Developed after enslaved African Americans given asylum at Fort Monroe were declared 

“contraband of war”

•     Freed those slaves located in the “rebelling” states (Southern states that had seceded)

•    Made the abolition of slavery a Northern war aim

•     Discouraged any interference of foreign governments

•     Allowed for the enlistment of African American soldiers in the Union Army

Gettysburg Address

•   Lincoln described the Civil War as a struggle to preserve a nation that was dedicated to the 

proposition that all men are created equal” and that was ruled by a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people.”

KEY VOCABULARY

Terms & Events

States’ rights

Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Civil War

Union

Confederacy

Confederate States of America

Secession

Emancipation Proclamation

Election of 1860

Gettysburg Address

Second Inaugural Address

Malice

Assassination

People

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Jefferson Davis

Abraham Lincoln

Ulysses S. Grant

Robert E. Lee

Frederick Douglass

Places

Ft. Sumter

Battle of Gettysburg

Battle of Antietam

Appomattox


Updated: May 18, 2018