Reading - 2017-18

Unit 2: Information & Explanatory

Communication:Speaking Listening, Media Literacy

The student will listen, draw conclusions, and share responses in subject-related group learning activities.

a)   Participate in and contribute to discussions across content areas.
Bloom's:  Apply

c)   Summarize information gathered in group activities.
Bloom's:  Understand

d)   Communicate new ideas to others.
Bloom's:  Apply

e)   Demonstrate the ability to collaborate with diverse teams.
Bloom's:  Understand

f)   Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
Bloom's:  Understand

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

·  So that when my friends and I are working on a group project in science and/or social studies, we can work as effectively as possible to ensure success.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will continue to develop the skills necessary to participate in large- and small-group learning activities.
  • Students will be active participants in discussions across content areas. They will become able to assume the role of the speaker and the role of the listener.
  • Students will refine their organizational skills in preparing, presenting, and summarizing information gathered in group activities.
  • Students will also be able to summarize their own material prior to delivering a presentation.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • participate effectively in subject-related group learning activities.
  • use their organizational skills in preparing, presenting, and summarizing information gathered in group activities.
  • communicate and collaborate with diverse teams while maintaining the ability to work independently as necessary to accomplish assigned tasks.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • participate in a range of discussions building on others’ ideas and clearly expressing their own (e.g., one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led).
  • follow rules for discussions and assigned group roles.
  • participate as active listeners in group learning activities by:
    • listening for main ideas;
    • listening for sequence of ideas; and
  • participate as informed contributors in subject-related group learning activities by:
    • asking and answering questions at appropriate times;
    • responding to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborating on the remarks of others;
    • communicating new ideas to others;
    • clarifying confusing points;
    • summarizing main ideas;
    • organizing information from group discussion for presentation;
    • preparing a prewriting tool (e.g., outline, web, or graphic organizer) for presentation prior to delivery; and
    • summarizing a presentation orally prior to delivery.
  • exhibit the ability to collaborate with diverse teams.
  • demonstrate that they can work independently on group-related tasks.

KEY VOCABULARY

collaborate

Updated: May 08, 2017

The student will use effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills to deliver planned oral presentations.


f)   Organize content sequentially around major ideas.
Bloom's:  Apply

g)   Summarize main points as they relate to main idea or supporting details.
Bloom's:  Apply

i)    Use language and style appropriate to the audience, topic, and purpose.
Bloom's: Apply

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

·  Because, if I run for a SGA office, I will need to make a speech to tell people why they should vote for me, and this speech needs to do this effectively.

·  Because, during the science fair competition, judges may need to interview me, and I need to be able to speak in a clear manner for them to understand my project.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will learn to plan and deliver oral presentations.
  • Students will begin to use dramatic gestures and facial expressions that are suitable to the content and the audience.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • select and organize information when preparing for an oral presentation.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • select information that develops the topic and is appropriate for the audience.
  • report on a topic or text sequencing ideas logically and using relevant facts  and descriptive details to support main ideas or themes.
  • narrow the topic.
  • organize content sequentially and group together related information.
  • put information in order, providing an overview of the information at the beginning or a summary of the information at the end..
  • use grammatically correct language.
  • expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, interest, and style.
  • use specific vocabulary and style to enhance oral presentations. 

KEY VOCABULARY

nonverbal

accentuate

audience

topic


Updated: May 08, 2017

Reading

The student will expand vocabulary when reading.

a)   Use context to clarify meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases.
Bloom's:  Apply

c)   Use knowledge of roots, affixes, synonyms, antonyms, and homophones.
Bloom's:  Apply

e)   Use dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, and other word-reference materials.
Bloom's:  Apply

g)   Study word meanings across content areas.
Bloom's:  Apply

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

·  So that when I come to a new word that I don’t know, I will know how to use context clues to help me understand better.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will continue to build vocabulary by applying their knowledge of word structure and context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.
  • Students will use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, roots, and affixes to read accurately multisyllabic words in context and out.
  • Students will build their knowledge of word origins by learning about Greek and Latin affixes.
  • Students will also use word-reference materials to learn new words.
  • Homophones are words that are pronounced the same and have different meanings regardless of their spelling (e.g., principle/ principal, prince/prints).

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • apply knowledge of word structure and context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • use context as a clue to infer the correct meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases.
  • apply knowledge of roots, affixes (prefixes and suffixes), synonyms, antonyms, and homophones.
  • begin to learn about Greek and Latin affixes.
  • understand that often a word can be divided into root word, prefix, and suffix in order to determine its pronunciation.
  • understand how a prefix changes the meaning of a root word.
  • use word references and context clues to determine which meaning is appropriate in a given situation.
  • identify the word-reference materials, such as a dictionary, glossary, or thesaurus, that is most likely to contain the information needed.
  • study cross-curricular vocabulary.

KEY VOCABULARY

composing

written expression

usage/mechanics

transition words and phrases: example;sequence;time or location

Updated: Feb 06, 2018

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction texts.

*b)   Use prior knowledge and build additional background knowledge as context for new learning.
Bloom's:  Apply

d)   Identify the main idea of nonfiction texts.
Bloom's:  Remember

e)   Summarize supporting details in nonfiction texts.
Bloom's:  Understand

*g)   Locate information to support opinions, predictions, and conclusions.
Bloom's:  Apply

k)   Identify new information gained from reading.
Bloom's:  Apply

*l)    Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.
Bloom's:  Apply

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

·  So that when researching for my science fair project, I am able to determine what is fact and what is opinion.

·  So that when I decide what NFL team I think is going to win the Super Bowl, I can compare and contrast the teams’ stats and records.

·  So that when completing a science fair project, I can compare/contrast the research from multiple materials to come up with a valid hypothesis.

·  So that when writing I may choose the correct format for my paper – compare/contrast, sequential, etc.

·  Because, when I am researching for information, if I know the structure of the text, I can better understand what I am reading.

·  So that, when I travel, and am looking for things to do, I will know how to read and understand brochures I may find in the hotel, or other tourist spots.

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will read and demonstrate comprehension of nonfiction texts across the curriculum, including age-appropriate materials that reflect the Virginia Standards of Learning in English, history and social science, science, and mathematics.
  • Students will demonstrate comprehension of a selection by using before-, during-, and after-reading strategies (e.g., using graphic organizers, question generation, and summarization).
  • Before reading, students will use text organizers to predict and categorize information.
  • During reading, students will formulate questions and make and revise ongoing predictions and inferences, using given information.
  • After reading, students will confirm or dismiss previous predictions and inferences. Students will also summarize content, identify important ideas, provide details, formulate opinions, and use writing to clarify their thinking (e.g., graphic organizers, responsive journaling).
  • Interactions between reader and text will become more sophisticated and deliberate as students make inferences, formulate opinions, and write to clarify their thinking.
  • Prosody refers to the rhythmic and intonational aspect of language, which should be noticeable during oral reading. Prosody contributes to reading fluency and comprehension.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • preview, pose questions, and make predictions before reading.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • apply prior knowledge to make predictions and build additional background knowledge as context for learning.
  • determine the main idea of a text and summarize supporting key details.
  • identify specific information in text that supports predictions.
  • identify new information learned from reading.
  • become aware of when they do not understand (e.g., by reflecting upon and articulating what exactly is causing difficulty).
  • read familiar text with fluency, accuracy, and prosody.

KEY VOCABULARY

chronological order

categorize

comprehension

monitor

strategies

accuracy


Updated: Feb 06, 2018

Writing

The student will write for a variety of purposes: to describe, to inform, to entertain, to explain, and to persuade.

a)   Identify intended audience.
Bloom's:  Remember

b)   Use a variety of pre-writing strategies.
Bloom's:  Apply

c)   Organize information to convey a central idea.
Bloom's:  Apply

d)   Write a clear topic sentence focusing on the main idea.
Bloom's:  Remember, Apply, Create

g)   Vary sentence structure by using transition words.
Bloom's:  Apply

h)   Revise for clarity of content using specific vocabulary and information.
Bloom's:  Apply

i)    Include supporting details that elaborate the main idea.
Bloom's:  Apply

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

·  So that should I decide to run for a SGA office position, I know the purpose for which I am writing is different from writing a “how-to” paragraph.

·  So that when writing a story for the kindergarten class, I pay careful attention to the vocabulary and language I use in my story.


UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will continue to write as a method of communication and as a means of expressing themselves.
  • Students will organize their thoughts and choose appropriate vocabulary to convey their message effectively.
  • There will be a continued emphasis on the students’ ability to shape and control language purposefully and to master the features of the composing and written expression domains.
  • Voice shows an author’s personality, awareness of audience, and passion for his or her subject. It adds liveliness and energy to writing.
  • The three domains of writing are
    • composing – the structuring and elaborating a writer does to construct an effective message for readers (e.g., staying on topic; beginning, middle, and end);
    • written expression – those features that show the writer purposefully shaping and controlling language to affect readers (e.g., specific vocabulary, descriptive words, tone/voice); and
    • usage/mechanics – the features that cause written language to be acceptable and effective for standard discourse (e.g., spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar).
  • Transition words and phrases provide organization to student writing by improving the connections between thoughts. Categories of transitions include, but are not limited to:
    • example (e.g., that is, for example, in fact)
    • sequence  (e.g., then, next, finally)
    • time or location (e.g., before, meanwhile, nearby)

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • plan and organize information as they write for a variety of purposes: to describe, to inform, to entertain, to explain, and to persuade.
  • use precise, descriptive vocabulary and vary sentence structure as they revise for clarity.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • apply knowledge of the writing domains of composing, written expression, and usage/mechanics.
  • produce a clear and coherent written piece in which the development and organization are appropriate to purpose and audience.
  • recognize different modes of writing have different patterns of organization
    • informative/explanatory
      • clearly introduce a topic and group related information in paragraphs
      • use facts, definitions, opinions, quotations, details, or other examples and  information to develop the topic
      • use specific vocabulary to inform and explain the topic; and
      • provide a concluding statement or section related to the topic
    • narrative
      • organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally
      • use transition words and phrases for sentence variety and to manage the sequence of events  
      • use specific vocabulary, words, and phrases to convey experiences and events
      • provide a conclusion
    • persuasive
      • introduce the position
      • provide evidence to support the position
      • provide points for the opposite side and argue against them
      • provide a conclusion.
  • create a plan, and organize thoughts before writing.
  • use a variety of prewriting strategies (e.g., brainstorming, listing, free-writing, and using graphic organizers.
  • focus, organize, and elaborate to construct an effective message for the reader.
  • write a clear topic sentence focusing on the main idea.
  • purposefully shape and control language to demonstrate an awareness of the intended audience.
  • select specific information to guide readers more purposefully through the piece.
  • develop and strengthen writing as needed, in consultation with peers or adults, by prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, or rewriting.
  • use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences or characters.
  • use precise language and content-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain a topic, to persuade, describe or entertain.
  • include sentences of various lengths and beginnings to create a pleasant, informal rhythm.
  • vary sentence structure by using transition words and phrases.
  • use precise language and phrases to develop writing (e.g., consequently, specifically, especially).
  • clarify writing when revising.
  • include supporting details that elaborate the main idea.
  • use available technology to gather information and to aid in writing.

KEY VOCABULARY

describe

inform

entertain

explain

persuade

intended audience

prewriting strategies

central idea

topic sentence

sentence structure

precise vocabulary

revise

elaborate

Updated: Dec 14, 2017

The student will edit writing for correct grammar, capitalization, spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraphing.

Bloom's:  Apply

a)   Use plural possessives.
Bloom's:  Apply

b)   Use adjective and adverb comparisons.
Bloom's:  Apply

d)   Use apostrophes in contractions and possessives.
Bloom's:  Apply

h)   Edit for fragments and run-on sentences.
Bloom's:  Apply

i)    Eliminate double negatives.
Bloom's:  Apply

j)    Use correct spelling of commonly used words.
Bloom's:  Apply

Adopted: 2010

BIG IDEAS

  • So that I can ensure that what I am actually writing matches what I intend for it to say.

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD

  • The intent of this standard is that students will understand and use the editing process.
  • Students will work to gain more control over the conventions of writing, including composing effective sentences with subject verb agreement, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.
  • Students will effectively use the following parts of speech: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, and interjections.
  • Teachers should begin to encourage students to incorporate variety into sentences, by appropriate use of subordinate (dependent) clauses.
  • Students should have practice writing on demand, for shorter time frames, and over  extended periods of time.

ESSENTIALS

All students should

  • understand that editing for correct sentence formation, grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation makes the meaning of the writing clearer to the reader.
  • revise and edit drafts for improvement, using teacher assistance and peer collaboration.

To be successful with this standard, students are expected to

  • punctuate correctly
    • apostrophes in contractions (e.g., isn’t), and possessives (e.g., Jan’s);
    • commas [e.g., items in a series, to set off the words yes and no; and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Chloe?)];
  • use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
  • use adverb comparisons (e.g., fast, faster, fastest).
  • use adjective comparisons (e.g., big, bigger, biggest).
  • use adverbs instead of adjectives where appropriate, (e.g., “He played really well.” instead of “He played real well.”).
  • use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie).
  • use plural possessives, (e.g., “The books’ covers are torn.”).
  • form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.
  • use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
  • avoid fragments.
  • avoid run-ons, (e.g., “I opened the door, the dog went out.”).
  • eliminate double negatives.
  • use correct spelling of commonly used words.
  • use technology, including the Internet, to produce, edit and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

KEY VOCABULARY

adverb comparisons

adjective comparisons

coordinate adjectives

plural possessives

sentence fragments

double negatives

verb tense

Updated: May 18, 2017